Friday, 2 November 2012

Win a Doctors Emergency Play Set with IWMN!


 






The Imperial War Museum North have been celebrating half term with some great free first aid and medicine themed children's activities keeping in the theme of their Saving Lives exhibition. From
hearing the tales of stretcher bearers during the Second World War to seeing real human X-rays
up close, there is something to entertain, captivate and engage all ages.

Younger visitors will be inspired by the work of doctors, nurses and medical teams as they get
the chance to dress up, play and create their own souvenirs to take home. Visitors can learn to
name parts of the human body and skeleton and learn more by seeing intriguing wartime X-rays
.


Click here to check out what is happening over the weekend including the chance to meet cuddly character Bumpty Bear and learn how friendship and first aid keep this clumsy character smiling or the opportunity to see a family-friendly performance based on the story of a stretcher bearer or First World War nurse.

The lovely folks at IWMN are giving very lucky My Mummy's Pennies readers the chance to Win a Doctors Emergency Play Set (as seen in the above picture) and four runners up will get a cuddly Bumpty Bear!

For your chance to win follow the rafflecopter instructions below... Good Luck!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

find more great competitions at ThePrizeFinder - UK Competitions

158 comments:

  1. One nasty side effect of living in the trenches was lice! It is estimated that 97% of the soldiers living in the trenches were infested. They used to refer to the lice as ‘chats’ and when they got together to pick the lice off each other, it was called ‘chatting up’ – a phrase we use frequently today!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Coconuts were used in the South Pacific in the Second World War during
    emergency blood transfusions – it was discovered coconut water is sterile (until
    opened) and it mixes easily with blood.
    Hmm, guess it must of worked but sounds a bit dodgy! xx :)

    ReplyDelete
  3. Before 1914, more people died from diseases in war time than battle injuries. The
    First World War was the first major conflict to reverse this trend - partly due to the
    first major use of vaccinations.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Disease, including the lethal Spanish Flu, caused about one third of military deaths
    during the First World War. The Spanish Flu caused havoc for the civillan population
    too, killing an estimated 50 million people worldwide.

    ReplyDelete
  5. The first guide dogs were to help German soldiers who had lost their sight in WWI. In 1916 Dr. Gerhard Stalling set up a school to train dogs.

    ReplyDelete
  6. My favourite fact that I never knew before reading your blog: Coconuts were used in the South Pacific in the Second World War during emergency blood transfusions – it was discovered coconut water is sterile (until opened) and it mixes easily with blood.

    ReplyDelete
  7. In 1916, Dr. Gerhard Stalling set up a school to train dogs to help German soldiers
    who had been blinded in the First World War. These were the first ever guide dogs.

    ReplyDelete
  8. In 1916, Dr. Gerhard Stalling set up a school to train dogs to help German soldiers
    who had been blinded in the First World War. These were the first ever guide dogs

    ReplyDelete
  9. I loved this fact: In 1916, Dr. Gerhard Stalling set up a school to train dogs to help German soldiers
    who had been blinded in the First World War. These were the first ever guide dogs.

    ReplyDelete
  10. The system of triage – which splits patients into three groups, depending on how serious their condition is – is used in all hospitals today. It originally came about during the Napoleonic Wars and became standard practice during the First World War.I found this really interesting- you learn something new every day!

    ReplyDelete
  11. Coconuts were used in the South Pacific in the Second World War during emergency blood transfusions – it was discovered coconut water is sterile

    ReplyDelete
  12. Before 1914, more people died from diseases in war time than battle injuries. The
    First World War was the first major conflict to reverse this trend - partly due to the
    first major use of vaccinations.

    ReplyDelete

  13. 1. Trench foot is a nasty condition that makes feet swollen and painful - and is
    caused by spending too long in damp, cold and unhygienic conditions (like not
    changing wet socks!). The name came about during the First World War as soldiers
    spent many hours in wet, soggy boots in the trenches.

    ReplyDelete
  14. John Simpson Kirkpatrick was a stretcher-bearer with the Australian and New
    Zealand Army Corps during the Gallipoli Campaign in the First World War. He and
    his donkey became famous for carrying injured British Empire soldiers from the
    frontline to safety.

    ReplyDelete
  15. One nasty side effect of living in the trenches was lice! It is estimated that
    97% of the soldiers living in the trenches were infested. They used to refer to the

    Tiffany Oconnell

    @toc83

    ReplyDelete
  16. Before 1914, more people died from diseases in war time than battle injuries. The
    First World War was the first major conflict to reverse this trend - partly due to the
    first major use of vaccinations.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Coconuts were used in the South Pacific in the Second World War during
    emergency blood transfusions – it was discovered coconut water is sterile (until
    opened) and it mixes easily with blood.

    ReplyDelete
  18. 1. Trench foot is a nasty condition that makes feet swollen and painful - and is caused by spending too long in damp, cold and unhygienic conditions (like not changing wet socks!). The name came about during the First World War as soldiers spent many hours in wet, soggy boots in the trenches.

    ReplyDelete
  19. In 1916, Dr. Gerhard Stalling set up a school to train dogs to help German soldiers who had been blinded in the First World War. These were the first ever guide dogs.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Anne-Marie (@Annieuk75)Friday, November 02, 2012

    In 1916, Dr. Gerhard Stalling set up a school to train dogs to help German soldiers
    who had been blinded in the First World War. These were the first ever guide dogs.
    Love this fact, my husband is visually impaired, never realised this. x

    ReplyDelete
  21. There were over 70,000 cases of trench foot during the First World War!@kathvbtn

    ReplyDelete
  22. number 1...Trench foot is a nasty condition that makes feet swollen and painful - and is
    caused by spending too long in damp, cold and unhygienic conditions (like not
    changing wet socks!). The name came about during the First World War as soldiers
    spent many hours in wet, soggy boots in the trenches.


    ReplyDelete
  23. One nasty side effect of living in the trenches was lice! It is estimated that
    97% of the soldiers living in the trenches were infested. They used to refer to the

    lice as ‘chats’ and when they got together to pick the lice off each other, it was
    called ‘chatting up’ – a phrase we use frequently today!

    ReplyDelete
  24. John Simpson Kirkpatrick was a stretcher-bearer with the Australian and New
    Zealand Army Corps during the Gallipoli Campaign in the First World War. He and his donkey became famous for carrying injured British Empire soldiers from the frontline to safety.

    ReplyDelete
  25. in 1916, Dr. Gerhard Stalling set up a school to train dogs to help German soldiers who had been blinded in the First World War. These were the first ever guide dogs

    ReplyDelete
  26. 6. The system of triage – which splits patients into three groups, depending on how
    serious their condition is – is used in all hospitals today. It originally came about
    during the Napoleonic Wars and became standard practice during the First World
    War.

    ReplyDelete
  27. In 1916, Dr. Gerhard Stalling set up a school to train dogs to help German soldiers
    who had been blinded in the First World War. These were the first ever guide dogs

    ReplyDelete
  28. 3. In 1916, Dr. Gerhard Stalling set up a school to train dogs to help German soldiers
    who had been blinded in the First World War. These were the first ever guide dogs.

    ReplyDelete
  29. In 1916, Dr. Gerhard Stalling set up a school to train dogs to help German soldiers
    who had been blinded in the First World War. These were the first ever guide dogs.

    ReplyDelete
  30. 10. Coconuts were used in the South Pacific in the Second World War during
    emergency blood transfusions – it was discovered coconut water is sterile (until opened) and it mixes easily with blood.

    ReplyDelete
  31. 6. The system of triage – which splits patients into three groups, depending on how
    serious their condition is – is used in all hospitals today. It originally came about
    during the Napoleonic Wars and became standard practice during the First World
    War.

    ReplyDelete
  32. Coconuts were used in the South Pacific in the Second World War during emergency blood transfusions – it was discovered coconut water is sterile (until opened) and it mixes easily with blood. :)

    ReplyDelete
  33. There were over 70,000 cases of trench foot during the First World War! To
    combat this dreaded disease, soldiers used a variety of methods from wearing dry
    socks, holding regular foot inspections and massaging feet with whale oil (which had
    an even more horrible smell than sweaty feet!)

    ReplyDelete
  34. The system of triage – which splits patients into three groups, depending on how
    serious their condition is – is used in all hospitals today. It originally came about
    during the Napoleonic Wars and became standard practice during the First World
    War. I always wondered where triage originated

    ReplyDelete
  35. I like this fact here:
    In 1916, Dr. Gerhard Stalling set up a school to train dogs to help German soldiers who had been blinded in the First World War. These were the first ever guide dogs.

    ReplyDelete
  36. In 1916, Dr. Gerhard Stalling set up a school to train dogs to help German soldiers
    who had been blinded in the First World War. These were the first ever guide dogs.

    ReplyDelete
  37. 2. There were over 70,000 cases of trench foot during the First World War!

    ReplyDelete
  38. Coconuts were used in the South Pacific in the Second World War during
    emergency blood transfusions – it was discovered coconut water is sterile (until
    opened) and it mixes easily with blood.

    ReplyDelete
  39. Disease, including the lethal Spanish Flu, caused about one third of military deaths
    during the First World War. The Spanish Flu caused havoc for the civillan population
    too, killing an estimated 50 million people worldwide.

    ReplyDelete
  40. In 1916, Dr. Gerhard Stalling set up a school to train dogs to help German soldiers
    who had been blinded in the First World War. These were the first ever guide dogs

    ReplyDelete
  41. 9. One nasty side effect of living in the trenches was lice! It is estimated that
    97% of the soldiers living in the trenches were infested. They used to refer to the lice as ‘chats’ and when they got together to pick the lice off each other, it was
    called ‘chatting up’ – a phrase we use frequently today!

    Lol, I will show my daughter this, imagine her horror when I ask her friends if they have been chatting people up ;)

    ReplyDelete
  42. Before 1914, more people died from diseases in war time than battle injuries

    ReplyDelete
  43. Trench foot is a nasty condition that makes feet swollen and painful -

    ReplyDelete
  44. John Simpson Kirkpatrick was a stretcher-bearer with the Australian and New
    Zealand Army Corps during the Gallipoli Campaign in the First World War. He and
    his donkey became famous for carrying injured British Empire soldiers from the
    frontline to safety.

    ReplyDelete
  45. 3. In 1916, Dr. Gerhard Stalling set up a school to train dogs to help German soldiers
    who had been blinded in the First World War. These were the first ever guide dogs

    ReplyDelete
  46. before 1914 more people died from disease in war than in battle

    ReplyDelete
  47. trench foot is a nasty condition that makes feet swollen and painful - and is
    caused by spending too long in damp, cold and unhygienic conditions (like not
    changing wet socks!). The name came about during the First World War as soldiers
    spent many hours in wet, soggy boots in the trenches.

    ReplyDelete
  48. 3. In 1916, Dr. Gerhard Stalling set up a school to train dogs to help German soldiers
    who had been blinded in the First World War. These were the first ever guide dogs.

    ReplyDelete
  49. They used coconuts in blood transfusions!

    ReplyDelete
  50. There were over 70,000 cases of trench foot during the First World War

    ReplyDelete
  51. The system of triage – which splits patients into three groups, depending on how
    serious their condition is – is used in all hospitals today. It originally came about
    during the Napoleonic Wars and became standard practice during the First World
    War.

    ReplyDelete
  52. there were over 70000 cases of trench foot in ww1

    ReplyDelete
  53. Coconuts were used in the South Pacific in the Second World War during
    emergency blood transfusions – it was discovered coconut water is sterile (until
    opened) and it mixes easily with blood

    ReplyDelete
  54. One nasty side effect of living in the trenches was lice! It is estimated that 97% of the soldiers living in the trenches were infested. They used to refer to the lice as ‘chats’ and when they got together to pick the lice off each other, it was called ‘chatting up’ – a phrase we use frequently today! Sounds a bit like primary school :/ x

    ReplyDelete
  55. There were over 70,000 cases of trench foot during the First World War! ouch

    ReplyDelete
  56. Coconuts were used in the South Pacific in the Second World War during
    emergency blood transfusions – it was discovered coconut water is sterile (until
    opened) and it mixes easily with blood.

    ReplyDelete
  57. Coconuts were used in the South Pacific in the Second World War during emergency blood transfusions – it was discovered coconut water is sterile (until opened) and it mixes easily with blood.
    fascinating fact xx

    ReplyDelete

  58. Coconuts were used in the South Pacific in the Second World War during
    emergency blood transfusions – it was discovered coconut water is sterile (until
    opened) and it mixes easily with blood.

    ReplyDelete
  59. Before 1914, more people died from diseases in war time than battle injuries. The
    First World War was the first major conflict to reverse this trend - partly due to the
    first major use of vaccinations.

    ReplyDelete
  60. There were over 70,000 cases of trench foot during the first world war

    ReplyDelete
  61. Coconuts were used in the South Pacific in the Second World War during
    emergency blood transfusions – it was discovered coconut water is sterile (until
    opened) and it mixes easily with blood

    ReplyDelete
  62. Coconuts were used in the South Pacific in the Second World War during emergency blood transfusions – it was discovered coconut water is sterile

    ReplyDelete
  63. Disease, including the lethal Spanish Flu, caused about one third of military deaths during the First World War. The Spanish Flu caused havoc for the civillan population too, killing an estimated 50 million people worldwide

    ReplyDelete
  64. Disease, including the lethal Spanish Flu, caused about one third of military deaths
    during the First World War. The Spanish Flu caused havoc for the civillan population
    too, killing an estimated 50 million people worldwide.

    ReplyDelete
  65. Coconuts were used in the South Pacific in the Second World War during
    emergency blood transfusions – it was discovered coconut water is sterile (until
    opened) and it mixes easily with blood

    ReplyDelete

  66. Coconuts were used in the South Pacific in the Second World War during
    emergency blood transfusions – it was discovered coconut water is sterile (until
    opened) and it mixes easily with blood.

    ReplyDelete
  67. There were over 70,000 cases of trench foot during the First World War! To
    combat this dreaded disease, soldiers used a variety of methods from wearing dry
    socks, holding regular foot inspections and massaging feet with whale oil (which had
    an even more horrible smell than sweaty feet!)

    ReplyDelete
  68. In 1916, Dr. Gerhard Stalling set up a school to train dogs to help German soldiers who had been blinded in the First World War. These were the first ever guide dogs.

    ReplyDelete
  69. In 1916, Dr. Gerhard Stalling set up a school to train dogs to help German soldiers
    who had been blinded in the First World War. These were the first ever guide dogs.

    ReplyDelete
  70. would love to win this fantastic set

    ReplyDelete
  71. 10. Coconuts were used in the South Pacific in the Second World War during
    emergency blood transfusions – it was discovered coconut water is sterile (until
    opened) and it mixes easily with blood.

    ReplyDelete
  72. Brilliant I never knew that Coconuts were used in the South Pacific in the Second World War during emergency blood transfusions – it was discovered coconut water is sterile (until opened) and it mixes easily with blood. Blimey what a fact!

    ReplyDelete
  73. set up a school to train dogs to help German soldiers who had been blinded in the First World War.

    ReplyDelete
  74. In 1916, Dr. Gerhard Stalling set up a school to train dogs to help German soldiers
    who had been blinded in the First World War. These were the first ever guide dogs. (Veronika Matewu)

    ReplyDelete
  75. In 1916, Dr. Gerhard Stalling set up a school to train dogs to help German soldiers
    who had been blinded in the First World War. These were the first ever guide dogs.

    ReplyDelete
  76. The system of triage – which splits patients into three groups, depending on how serious their condition is – is used in all hospitals today. It originally came about during the Napoleonic Wars and became standard practice during the First World War

    ReplyDelete
  77. 6. The system of triage – which splits patients into three groups, depending on how
    serious their condition is – is used in all hospitals today. It originally came about
    during the Napoleonic Wars and became standard practice during the First World
    War.

    ReplyDelete
  78. Coconuts were used in the South Pacific in the Second World War during
    emergency blood transfusions – it was discovered coconut water is sterile (until opened) and it mixes easily with blood.

    @littleboo_21

    ReplyDelete
  79. In 1916, Dr. Gerhard Stalling set up a school to train dogs to help German soldiers
    who had been blinded in the First World War. These were the first ever guide dogs.

    ReplyDelete
  80. I never knew this!!: Coconuts were used in the South Pacific in the Second World War during emergency blood transfusions – it was discovered coconut water is sterile (until opened) and it mixes easily with blood.

    ReplyDelete
  81. In 1916, Dr. Gerhard Stalling set up a school to train dogs to help German soldiers who had been blinded in the First World War. These were the first ever guide dogs.

    ReplyDelete
  82. In 1916, Dr. Gerhard Stalling set up a school to train dogs to help German soldiers who had been blinded in the First World War. These were the first ever guide dogs.

    ReplyDelete
  83. Trench foot is a nasty condition that makes feet swollen and painful - and is
    caused by spending too long in damp, cold and unhygienic conditions (like not
    changing wet socks!). The name came about during the First World War as soldiers
    spent many hours in wet, soggy boots in the trenches.

    ReplyDelete
  84. 1. Trench foot is a nasty condition that makes feet swollen and painful - and is
    caused by spending too long in damp, cold and unhygienic conditions (like not
    changing wet socks!). The name came about during the First World War as soldiers
    spent many hours in wet, soggy boots in the trenches.

    ReplyDelete
  85. Trench foot is a nasty condition that makes feet swollen and painful - and is
    caused by spending too long in damp, cold and unhygienic conditions (like not
    changing wet socks!). The name came about during the First World War as soldiers
    spent many hours in wet, soggy boots in the trenches.

    ReplyDelete
  86. The system of triage – which splits patients into three groups, depending on how serious their condition is – is used in all hospitals today. It originally came about during the Napoleonic Wars and became standard practice during the First World

    ReplyDelete
  87. Coconuts were used in the South Pacific in the Second World War during
    emergency blood transfusions – it was discovered coconut water is sterile (until
    opened) and it mixes easily with blood.

    ReplyDelete
  88. In 1916, Dr. Gerhard Stalling set up a school to train dogs to help German soldiers who had been blinded in the First World War. These were the first ever guide dogs.

    ReplyDelete
  89. The first guide dogs were to help German soldiers who had lost their sight in WWI. In 1916 Dr. Gerhard Stalling set up a school to train dogs.

    ReplyDelete
  90. Coconuts were used in the South Pacific in the Second World War during emergency blood transfusions – it was discovered coconut water is sterile

    ReplyDelete
  91. Disease, including the lethal Spanish Flu, caused about one third of military deaths
    during the First World War. The Spanish Flu caused havoc for the civillan population
    too, killing an estimated 50 million people worldwide.

    ReplyDelete
  92. The system of triage – which splits patients into three groups, depending on how serious their condition is – is used in all hospitals today. It originally came about during the Napoleonic Wars and became standard practice during the First World War.

    ReplyDelete
  93. Coconuts were used in the WW2 during emergency blood transfusions

    ReplyDelete
  94. Trench foot is a nasty condition that makes feet swollen and painful - and is caused by spending too long in damp, cold and unhygienic conditions (like not changing wet socks!). The name came about during the First World War as soldiers spent many hours in wet, soggy boots in the trenches.

    ReplyDelete
  95. Coconuts were used in the South Pacific in the Second World War during emergency blood transfusions – it was discovered coconut water is sterile

    ReplyDelete
  96. Coconuts were used in the South Pacific in the Second World War during
    emergency blood transfusions – it was discovered coconut water is sterile (until
    opened) and it mixes easily with blood.

    ReplyDelete
  97. 6. The system of triage – which splits patients into three groups, depending on how
    serious their condition is – is used in all hospitals today. It originally came about
    during the Napoleonic Wars and became standard practice during the First World
    War.

    That's fab!! I had no idea it was from that long ago. I always wondered why we had to see Triage nurses first :)

    ReplyDelete
  98. The first guide dogs were to help German soldiers who had lost their sight in WWI. In 1916 Dr. Gerhard Stalling set up a school to train dogs.

    ReplyDelete
  99. Coconuts were used in the South Pacific in the Second World War during
    emergency blood transfusions – it was discovered coconut water is sterile (until
    opened) and it mixes easily with blood.

    @claireishoop

    ReplyDelete
  100. The first guide dogs were to help German soldiers who had lost their sight in WWI. In 1916 Dr. Gerhard Stalling set up a school to train dogs.

    ReplyDelete
  101. STUART HARGREAVESSunday, November 18, 2012

    COCONUTS WERE USED IN THE SOUTH PACIFIC IN THE SECOND WORLD WAR DURING EMERGENCY BLOOD TRANSFUSIONS - IT WAS DISCOVERED THAT COCONUT WATER IS STERILE ( UNTIL OPENED) AND IT MIXES EASILY WITH BLOOD

    ReplyDelete
  102. 3. In 1916, Dr. Gerhard Stalling set up a school to train dogs to help German soldiers
    who had been blinded in the First World War. These were the first ever guide dogs.

    ReplyDelete
  103. In 1916, Dr. Gerhard Stalling set up a school to train dogs to help German soldiers who had been blinded in the First World War. These were the first ever guide dogs.

    ReplyDelete
  104. 9. One nasty side effect of living in the trenches was lice! It is estimated that
    97% of the soldiers living in the trenches were infested. They used to refer to the

    lice as ‘chats’ and when they got together to pick the lice off each other, it was
    called ‘chatting up’ – a phrase we use frequently today!

    ReplyDelete
  105. I loved the fact about Guide Dogs - In 1916, Dr. Gerhard Stalling set up a school to train dogs to help German soldiers
    who had been blinded in the First World War. These were the first ever guide dogs.

    Thanks for the givaway x

    ReplyDelete
  106. Coconuts were used in the South Pacific in the Second World War during emergency blood transfusions – it was discovered coconut water is sterile (until opened) and it mixes easily with blood.

    ReplyDelete
  107. Trench foot is a nasty condition that leaves yous feet painful and swollen

    ReplyDelete
  108. Coconuts were used in the South Pacific in the Second World War during
    emergency blood transfusions – it was discovered coconut water is sterile (until opened) and it mixes easily with blood.

    ReplyDelete
  109. Coconuts were ued in the Sout Pacific in the Second World War during emergency blood transfusions - it was discovered coconut water is sterile (until opened) and it mixes easily with blood.

    ReplyDelete
  110. Coconuts were used in the South Pacific in the Second World War during
    emergency blood transfusions – it was discovered coconut water is sterile (until opened) and it mixes easily with blood.

    ReplyDelete
  111. Before 1914, more people died from diseases in war time than battle injuries. The
    First World War was the first major conflict to reverse this trend - partly due to the
    first major use of vaccinations.

    ReplyDelete
  112. Before 1914, more people died from diseases in war time than battle injuries. The First World War was the first major conflict to reverse this trend - partly due to the first major use of vaccinations.

    ReplyDelete
  113. spanish flu caused 1/3rd of military dath

    ReplyDelete
  114. One nasty side effect of living in the trenches was lice! It is estimated that 97% of the soldiers living in the trenches were infested. They used to refer to the lice as ‘chats’ and when they got together to pick the lice off each other, it was called ‘chatting up’ – a phrase we use frequently today!

    ReplyDelete
  115. Coconuts were used in the South Pacific in the Second World War during emergency blood transfusions – it was discovered coconut water is sterile (until opened) and it mixes easily with blood.

    ReplyDelete
  116. Before 1914, more people died from diseases in war time than battle injuries. The First World War was the first major conflict to reverse this trend - partly due to the first major use of vaccinations.

    ReplyDelete
  117. The first guide dogs were to help German soldiers who had lost their sight in WWI. In 1916 Dr. Gerhard Stalling set up a school to train dogs.

    ReplyDelete
  118. Before 1914, more people died from diseases in war time than battle injuries. The First World War was the first major conflict to reverse this trend - partly due to the first major use of vaccinations.

    ReplyDelete
  119. In 1916, Dr. Gerhard Stalling set up a school to train dogs to help German soldiers who had been blinded in the First World War. These were the first ever guide dogs.

    ReplyDelete
  120. One nasty side effect of living in the trenches was lice! It is estimated that
    97% of the soldiers living in the trenches were infested. They used to refer to the


    lice as ‘chats’ and when they got together to pick the lice off each other, it was
    called ‘chatting up’ – a phrase we use frequently today!

    ReplyDelete
  121. Before 1914, more people died from diseases in war time than battle Injuries. The First World War was the first major conflict to reverse this trend - partly due to the first major use of vaccinations.

    ReplyDelete
  122. Love this - In 1916, Dr. Gerhard Stalling set up a school to train dogs to help German soldiers who had been blinded in the First World War. These were the first ever guide dogs. :) xoxo

    ReplyDelete
  123. Before 1914, more people died from diseases in war time than battle injuries.

    ReplyDelete
  124. Trench foot is a nasty condition that makes feet swollen and painful - and is
    caused by spending too long in damp, cold and unhygienic conditions (like not
    changing wet socks!). The name came about during the First World War as soldiers
    spent many hours in wet, soggy boots in the trenches.

    ReplyDelete
  125. Coconuts were used in the South Pacific in the Second World War during
    emergency blood transfusions – it was discovered coconut water is sterile (until
    opened) and it mixes easily with blood.

    ReplyDelete
  126. The system of triage – which splits patients into three groups, depending on how
    serious their condition is – is used in all hospitals today. It originally came about
    during the Napoleonic Wars and became standard practice during the First World
    War.

    ReplyDelete
  127. In 1916, Dr. Gerhard Stalling set up a school to train dogs to help German soldiers
    who had been blinded in the First World War. These were the first ever guide dogs.

    ReplyDelete
  128. A nasty side effect of living in the trenches was lice

    ReplyDelete
  129. 1. Trench foot is a nasty condition that makes feet swollen and painful - and is
    caused by spending too long in damp, cold and unhygienic conditions (like not
    changing wet socks!). The name came about during the First World War as soldiers
    spent many hours in wet, soggy boots in the trenches.

    ReplyDelete
  130. Coconuts were used in the South Pacific in the Second World War during emergency blood transfusions – it was discovered coconut water is sterile

    ReplyDelete
  131. There were over 70,000 cases of trench foot during the First World War

    ReplyDelete
  132. Georgia McallisterSaturday, November 24, 2012

    Coconuts were used in the South Pacific in the Second World War during emergency blood transfusions – it was discovered coconut water is sterile (until opened) and it mixes easily with blood.

    ReplyDelete
  133. . There were over 70,000 cases of trench foot during the First World War! To
    combat this dreaded disease, soldiers used a variety of methods from wearing dry
    socks, holding regular foot inspections and massaging feet with whale oil (which had
    an even more horrible smell than sweaty feet!)

    ReplyDelete
  134. During the First World War, a soldier almost literally came back from the dead.
    Lieutenant Hugh Bird MC was seriously wounded during intense fighting in France
    in March 1918. In the confusion, his fellow officers thought he had been killed. His
    family were told and a memorial service was held. But in May 1918, it became clear
    that Bird was still alive. He had been taken prisoner, given basic medical treatment
    and sent to a prisoner-of-war camp in Germany. Bird was sent home to Britain in
    September 1918

    ReplyDelete
  135. Trench foot is a nasty condition that makes feet swollen and painful - and is
    caused by spending too long in damp, cold and unhygienic conditions (like not
    changing wet socks!). The name came about during the First World War as soldiers
    spent many hours in wet, soggy boots in the trenches.

    ReplyDelete
  136. The system of triage – which splits patients into three groups, depending on how serious their condition is – is used in all hospitals today. It originally came about during the Napoleonic Wars and became standard practice during the First World War.

    ReplyDelete
  137. In 1916, Dr. Gerhard Stalling set up a school to train dogs to help German soldiers who had been blinded in the First World War. These were the first ever guide dogs.

    ReplyDelete
  138. In 1916, Dr. Gerhard Stalling set up a school to train dogs to help German soldiers
    who had been blinded in the First World War. These were the first ever guide dogs

    ReplyDelete
  139. In 1916, Dr. Gerhard Stalling set up a school to train dogs to help German soldiers
    who had been blinded in the First World War. These were the first ever guide dogs

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  140. This must have been awful, can't imagine how terrible it would be to have cold wet feet constantly. YUCK!

    1. Trench foot is a nasty condition that makes feet swollen and painful - and is caused by spending too long in damp, cold and unhygienic conditions (like not changing wet socks!). The name came about during the First World War as soldiers spent many hours in wet, soggy boots in the trenches.

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  141. 1. Trench foot is a nasty condition that makes feet swollen and painful - and is
    caused by spending too long in damp, cold and unhygienic conditions (like not
    changing wet socks!). The name came about during the First World War as soldiers
    spent many hours in wet, soggy boots in the trenches.

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  142. Disease, including the lethal Spanish Flu, caused about one third of military deaths
    during the First World War. The Spanish Flu caused havoc for the civillan population
    too, killing an estimated 50 million people worldwide.

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  143. im a nurse and i didnt know this!! Coconuts were used in the South Pacific in the Second World War during emergency blood transfusions – it was discovered coconut water is sterile (until opened) and it mixes easily with blood.

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  144. Love this fact - In 1916, Dr. Gerhard Stalling set up a school to train dogs to help German soldiers who had been blinded in the First World War. These were the first ever guide dogs.

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  145. The first guide dogs were to help German soldiers who had lost their sight in WWI. In 1916 Dr. Gerhard Stalling set up a school to train dogs.

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  146. In 1916, Dr. Gerhard Stalling set up a school to train dogs to help German soldiers who had been blinded in the First World War. These were the first ever guide dogs.

    ReplyDelete
  147. One nasty side effect of living in the trenches was lice! It is estimated that 97% of the soldiers living in the trenches were infested. They used to refer to the lice as ‘chats’ and when they got together to pick the lice off each other, it was called ‘chatting up’ – a phrase we use frequently today!

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  148. One nasty side effect of living in the trenches was lice! It is estimated that 97% of the soldiers living in the trenches were infested. They used to refer to the lice as ‘chats’ and when they got together to pick the lice off each other, it was called ‘chatting up’ – a phrase we use frequently today!







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  149. John Simpson Kirkpatrick was a stretcher-bearer with the Australian and New
    Zealand Army Corps during the Gallipoli Campaign in the First World War. He and
    his donkey became famous for carrying injured British Empire soldiers from the
    frontline to safety.

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  150. One nasty side effect of living in the trenches was lice! It is estimated that
    97% of the soldiers living in the trenches were infested. They used to refer to the

    lice as ‘chats’ and when they got together to pick the lice off each other, it was
    called ‘chatting up’ – a phrase we use frequently today!

    ReplyDelete
  151. 7. Before 1914, more people died from diseases in war time than battle injuries. The
    First World War was the first major conflict to reverse this trend - partly due to the
    first major use of vaccinations.

    ReplyDelete
  152. In 1916, Dr. Gerhard Stalling set up a school to train dogs to help German soldiers
    who had been blinded in the First World War. These were the first ever guide dogs

    ReplyDelete
  153. Coconuts were used in the South Pacific in the Second World War during
    emergency blood transfusions – it was discovered coconut water is sterile (until
    opened) and it mixes easily with blood.

    ReplyDelete
  154. 1st guide dogs used to help German soldiers who had lost their sight in WWI

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  155. Coconuts were used in the South Pacific in the Second World War during
    emergency blood transfusions
    Interesting! :) x

    ReplyDelete
  156. Coconuts were used in the South Pacific in the Second World War during
    emergency blood transfusions – it was discovered coconut water is sterile (until
    opened) and it mixes easily with blood

    ReplyDelete
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    ReplyDelete

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